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Dropped V-Stitch – Vintage Crochet Stitch

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Get ready to step back in time and unlock the magic of a vintage crochet stitch from 1916: the dropped v-stitch. Trust me, it’s going to be a blast! This stitch is not only full of old-school charm but also creates a jaw-dropping pattern when you work it up in three vibrant colors.

Now, here’s the best part: when you use those three colors, the yarn can magically be carried up the sides of the project, leaving you with only a few ends to weave in. How awesome is that? Plus, the result is an absolutely stunning pattern that will make you feel like a crochet wizard.

But wait, there’s more! If you’re feeling daring, why not try a self-striping yarn? It’ll give you a similar effect with those colors blending and shifting effortlessly, like a work of art. Or if you’re more into the classic vibes, this pattern can also be worked up in a solid color.

Now, I have a confession to make: this pattern is a bit of a “yarn eater.” Yep, it loves to gobble up yarn and create a dense finished object. But hey, that’s not necessarily a bad thing! It could actually make for an incredibly cozy weighted blanket.

If you’re making something for a sweet little newborn or prefer a lighter project, opt for a #3 weight yarn, and you’ll still end up with a breathtaking result that’s just as beautiful.

Once you conquer the first two rows, which might require a bit of patience, the rest of the pattern is a breeze. It’s a simple two-row repeat that’ll have you hooked in no time. And here’s a secret: since we work into the spaces, it’s the perfect project for those relaxing moments when you’re crocheting in low light, like snuggled up on the couch watching your favorite TV show.

Even though the first two rows might give you a little challenge, this pattern is totally doable for advanced beginners. I’ll be right here with you, guiding you every step of the way. You’ll feel like a crochet pro before you know it!

So grab your hooks, gather your colors of choice, and let’s dive into the wonderful world of the dropped v-stitch. Whether you’re making a cozy weighted masterpiece or a lighter blanket for a precious little one, this pattern is going to blow your mind with its beauty. Get ready to crochet your way to pure crochet magic!

Materials and Tools

This pattern can be worked with any weight of yarn and the corresponding hook. I recommend you start with a 3 or 4 weight yarn. I’m using a #4 worsted weight yarn and size I (5.5mm) crochet hook.

If you are making a baby blanket, I do recommend using a #2 or #3 weight yarn for this project as the #4 weight yarn turns out quite heavy. Of course, this also makes it a great option for a weighted crochet blanket for older children or adults.

To get the exact colors in the blanket pictured in this post, you’ll want to pickup the following colors:

03/25/2024 12:42 am GMT

For this swatch, I’ll be using 3 colors however, this pattern looks great in self-striping yarns and can be worked up in a single color as well if you would like.

  • Size I (5.5mm) Crochet Hook (I use this set)
  • Yarn Needle (to weave in ends)
  • Scissors
Dropped V-Stitch worked in a self striping rainbow colored yarn
In this swatch you can see how the Dropped V-Stitch works up in a self striping yarn, Lion Brand Mandala Ombre in the color Happy.

Pattern Notes

  • Yarn Eater – This pattern is absolutely a yarn eater. While it creates a beautiful pattern (especially if three colors are used), it uses a lot of yarn compared to other projects of the same size.
  • Works Up Slowly – This pattern works up pretty slowly compared to most stitch patterns due to the way we drop down for each row. I would say it works up only slightly faster than a single crochet blanket.
  • Dense & Heavy – This could be both a pro and a con. If you are wanting to make a weighted crochet blanket, this stitch might be perfect. If you are looking for a lightweight and flowy blanket, this isn’t the stitch for you.

Stitches Used

Chain (ch)

  1. Yarn over (yo)
  2. Pull through loop

Single Crochet (sc)

  1. Insert hook under both top loops of the stitch you are working into.
  2. Yarn over (yo)
  3. Pull through the stitch (there should now be two loops on your hook)
  4. Yarn over (yo)
  5. Pull through both loops on your hook.

Double Crochet (dc)

V-Stitch

  1. Double crochet
  2. Chain 1
  3. Double crochet in the same stitch

Stitch Diagram

The dropped V-Stitch was kind of hard for me to illustrate so, instead of a typical diagram that shows all rows at once, I’ve broken it down into 3 diagrams so that you can see where the stitches are placed for each row.

Row 1 & 2

For row 1, you’ll make a chain in multiples of 3 until the chain is the width you would like your project to be. Then, you’ll work your first v-stitch into the third chain from the hook, skip 2 chains, and work your second v-stitch. Row one repeats this v-stitch, skip 2 sequence across the length of the chain. You’ll end with a v-stitch in the last chain.

Row 2 is where things can get a little tricky if you are new to crochet. You’ll chain 1 and turn. Place a single crochet in the last double crochet from the row below. Chain 1 and work a v-stitch just to the left of the v-stitch in the row below. You’ll continue to work your v-stitches into that same spot as you go across your work. When you reach the end of the row, chain 1 and single crochet into the top of the chain 2.

If you need a visual reference, scroll down to the detailed photo guides at the bottom of this post for where you should place your v-stitches for row 2.

💡 TIP: Really, you could use either of the two chains from the foundation row for row 2. I use the one closest to the hook as I crochet across so the stitch doesn’t have to stretch as far, which only matters for that first v-stitch.

Row 3

Row 3 is the first of our two repeat rows. For this row, you’ll work your v-stitches in the chain 1 spaces two rows below. You can see in the illustration below I’ve greyed out row 2. You want to skip that row that is just beneath your current row and then work into the chain 1 spaces the second row below your current one.

Row 4

Row 4 is similar to row 3 except that we need to add one chain after our starting single crochet. This chain helps us bridge the gap to make our first v-stitch 2 rows below. Likewise, row 4 has a chain 1 between the last v-stitch and the ending single crochet, again to help bridge that gap.

Free Dropped V-Stitch Pattern

This stitch has a repeat of 3. That means you’ll work your starting chain in sets of 3 until it the chain is roughly the width you would like your blanket to be. For this tutorial, we’re going to create a block that is approximately 7″ wide by 7″ high for my stitch sampler blanket.

  • Skill Level: Advanced Beginner
  • # Ends to Weave In: 6 (if you use three colors of yarn)

Pattern written using US terms.

Starting Chain: Start with a chain of 24 (or any multiple of 3)

Row 1: Double crochet in the 3rd chain from your hook. Chain 1, Double crochet in the same stitch. This forms your first V-stitch. *Skip 2 chains, and work a V-Stitch in the next.* Repeat from * until the end of your starting chain.

💡 Tip: You should end with a V-Stitch in the very last chain. If your count is off by one, you can fudge it a bit here by skipping one more or one less than normal.

Row 2: Chain 1 and turn. Work a single crochet into the top of the last double crochet from the row below. Chain 1. Work a V-Stitch into the starting chain that is just to the left of the v-stitch from the previous row. Continue working V-Stitches into the starting chain, just to the left of each v-stitch from the previous row. When you reach the end of the row, chain 1, single crochet into the top of the chain 2 in the row below.

💡 Tip: If you have trouble getting into the top of the chain 2, you can single crochet into the space between the chain 2 and the first double crochet instead.

Row 3: Chain 1 and turn. Work a single crochet into the top of the single crochet from the row below. Work a V-Stitch into the chain 1 space of the V-Stitch in row 1. Continue working a v-stitch into each chain 1 space in row 1 until you reach the end of the row. Single crochet into the top of the single crochet from row 2.

Row 4: Chain 1 and turn. Work a single crochet into the top of the single crochet from the row below. Chain 1. Work a V-Stitch into the chain 1 space of the V-Stitch in row 2. Continue working a v-stitch into each chain 1 space in row 2 until you reach the end of the row. Chain 1 and single crochet into the top of the single crochet from row 3.

Repeat: Rows 3 & 4 are your repeat row. You’ll continue to work your v-stitches until your project reaches the size that you want it to be.

Final Row: To work the final row, I like to adjust the height just a little bit by working my v-stitches with half double crochets instead of double crochets. You can end on a repeat of either row 3 or row 4, but I found that shortening the stitch height by using half-double crochets for the v-stitches gives me a nicer edge when I add my border.

Video Tutorial

Step-by-Step with Photos

a crochet chain with 12 stitches and a yarn needle showing the third chain from the hook
Your starting chain can be any multiple of 3.

Row 1

a crochet chain with a double crochet placed in the third chain from the hook
Row 1: Double Crochet in the third chain from the hook
A crochet chain with a v-stitch placed into the third chain from the hook
Row 1: Chain 1 and place another double crochet into the same space. This forms your first v-stitch.
A crochet swatch with three v-stitches. A yarn needle is placed through the last chain on the foundation row to indicate where the last v-stitch should be placed.
Row 1: Continue placing v-stitches across your chain, skipping 2 chains between every v-stitch. When you reach the end of the row, you should have three chains remaining. Place your last v-stitch in the last chain space.
crochet swatch showing an incomplete double crochet stitch
Row 1: If you are changing colors every row as I did in my blanket, for your last double crochet, stop with two loops remaining on your hook as shown above.
hot pink crochet swatch with a navy yarn laid behind it
Row 1: Lay your new color behind your work. Be sure to leave a long enough tail to weave in later.
navy yarn being used to complete the last part of a double crochet from the pink row below
Row 1: Yarn over with the navy yarn and pull through the two loops on the hook. Do not cut your first color of yarn. We’ll carry the yarn up the side to use in a future row.

Row 2

A crochet swatch showing a chain 1 with navy yarn
Row 2: Chain 1
Crochet sample that has just been turned so that row 2 can be worked.
Row 2: Turn your work
a crochet swatch with a yarn needle placed through the first double crochet indicating where the next stitch should go
Row 2: Place a single crochet into the top of the first double crochet (indicated with a yarn needle here).
crochet swatch with a yarn needle showing the placement of the next stitch and yellow arrows showing the placement of the following two stitches
Row 2: Chain 1. You will work your next set of v-stitches into the foundation chain, just to the left of the first row of v-stitches. I’ve indicated the first one with the yarn needle, and the next two with arrows.
crochet swatch showing first stitches of row 2 complete and a yarn needle indicating where the next stitch should go. A yellow arrow indicates where the subsequent stitch should be placed
Row 2: Continue placing your v-stitches just to the left of the v-stitches from row 1 until you reach the end of the row.
a crochet swatch where a yarn needle is placed in the last stitch to indicate where the last stitch of the row should be placed
Row 2: Once you reach the end of the row, you’ll want to chain 1 and then start placing a single crochet into the top of the starting chain 2. This is the stitch just to the left of the double crochet. If
a crochet swatch showing a single crochet that has been started in the last stitch but not finished
Row 2: If you are changing color, do not complete the single crochet, instead leave two loops on your hook as shown.
a crochet swatch showing a change of color from navy to yellow
Row 2: Change color to yellow in the same manner as for blue, by yarning over and pulling through with the new color.

Row 3

a crochet swatch with a yarn needle placed under the first stitch from the row below the current row indicating where the next single crochet should be placed
Row 3: Chain 1 and turn. Work a single crochet into the single crochet from the row below (indicated with a yarn needle)
a crochet swatch showing where the first v-stitch of the pattern should be worked for row 3. The space is indicated with a yarn needle.
Row 3: Work a v-stitch into the chain 1 space two rows below. Note that in this picture, we’re skipping over the previous row (blue) and working into the chain 1 space below that (pink). This space is indicated with the yarn needle.
crochet swatch with arrows pointing where the next three v-stitches should ve placed.
Row 3: Continue placing v-stitches into the chain 1 spaces 2 rows below until you reach the end of your row.
crochet swatch with three rows complete showing start of single crochet for last stitch
Row 3: Single crochet into the top of the single crochet from the row below (blue). If you are changing colors, do not complete the single crochet.
closeup of a crochet swatch where we are changing color from yellow to pink by carrying yarn up the side
Row 3: If you are working with three colors, as I did for my blanket and this swatch, you will now be able to carry your first color up the side to use for row 4. To do this, yarn over and pull through with the color from row 1 (pink).

Row 4

crochet swatch showing a chain 1 that has been completed with a new color
Row 4: Chain 1
A yarn needle shows where the next stitch of the crochet pattern should be placed.
Row 4: Turn your work and work a single crochet into the top of the single crochet from the row below (indicated here with a yarn needle)
a yarn needle shows where the next stitch should be placed in a crochet swatch
Row 4: Because the spot for the next v-stitch is so far over (as indicated with the yarn needle), chain 1 and then work your v-stitch into the chain 1 space of the v-stitch two rows below.
a crochet swatch with several v-stitches completed and a yarn needle indicating where the last stitch should be placed
Row 4: Continue working your v-stitches across until you reach the end of the row. You’ll need to chain 1 and place a single crochet into the single crochet from the previous row (indicated here with a yarn needle).
Row 4: If you are working a blanket with three colors, you’ll change colors again here by carrying the yarn up the side as we have done in previous rows.

Row 5

a yarn needle shows where the next v-stitch in the crochet swatch should be placed.
Row 5: Chain 1 and turn. Work a V-stitch into the chain 1 space of the v-stitch two rows below (indicated with a yarn needle).
single crochet being placed at the end of a row.
Row 5: Continue working your v-stitches across until you reach the end of the row. End the row by placing a single crochet into the single crochet from the row below.
closeup of where the last stitch should be placed in a row. A yarn needle is under the two loops of the stitch where the last single crochet is placed
Row 5: This is a closeup showing the top of the last single crochet where your ending single crochet should go. You may have to angle your work slightly toward you in order to see it clearly.
Dropped V-Stitch

Dropped V-Stitch

Get ready to step back in time and unlock the magic of a vintage crochet stitch from 1916: the dropped v-stitch. Trust me, it’s going to be a blast! This stitch is not only full of old-school charm but also creates a jaw-dropping pattern when you work it up in three vibrant colors.

Abbreviations List 
  • ch – chain
  • ch-sp – chain space 
  • dc –  double crochet
  • sc – single crochet
  • v-st –  V-stitch
Special Stitches 
  • V-Stitch (V-st): (dc, ch 1, dc) in indicated st or space.  

Materials

  • This pattern can be worked with any weight of yarn and the corresponding hook. I recommend you start with a 3 or 4 weight yarn. I’m using a #4 worsted weight yarn and size I (5.5mm) crochet hook.

Tools

  • Size I (5.5mm) Crochet Hook
  • Yarn Needle (to weave in ends)
  • Scissors

Instructions

  1. Ch 24.
  2. Row 1: Dc in 3rd ch from hook, ch 1, dc in same st (counts as first v-st), *sk 2 chs, v-st in next ch, rep from * across.
  3. Row 2: Ch 1, turn, sc in top of last dc of previous row, ch 1, *v-st in beg ch (2 rows below) to the left of v-st, repeat from * across, ch 1, sc in top of beg ch 2 of previous row.
  4. Row 3: Ch 1, turn, sc in sc of previous row, *v-st in ch-1 sp of v-st in row 1, repeat from * across, sc in last sc.
  5. Row 4: Ch 1, turn, sc in sc of previous row, ch 1, *v-st in ch-1 sp of v-st in row 2, repeat from * across, ch 1, sc in last sc.
  6. Repeat Rows 3 & 4 until your project measures approx. 6.5”.
  7. Last Row: Work same as either row 3 or row 4 using hdc v-sts.
  8. Fasten off.

Notes

  • This pattern is a yarn eater. While it creates a beautiful pattern, it uses a lot of yarn compared to other projects the same size.
  • To adjust size, work in multiples of 3.  
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